“Cheesy” pasta with vegan sausage and broccoli

Whole wheat pasta with apple sage Field Roast sausage, broccoli, and a cheese sauce made from Daiya mozzarella, Earth Balance, and almond milk (unsweetened.)

Lately, I’ve just been making big one pot meals with a big serving of whole grains and green vegetables and also some kind of protein (beans, or in this case, the vegan sausage, which is soy-free, but based off of apples, potatoes, and grains.) I made a chili, lasagna, veggie enchiladas, that kind of stuff.

This meal wasn’t particularly as healthy as I would have liked. The sausage is delicious, but high in fat and pretty oily. As are the Earth Balance and Daiya cheese too. But I was just feeling a treat. Next time, I would remake this with cherry tomatoes, broccoli, and balsamic marinated mushrooms. Then I would make a thick cashew based cream sauce to go on top. Yumm… I kind of wish I had thought of that instead…

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2 Comments on ““Cheesy” pasta with vegan sausage and broccoli”

  1. Bennington says:

    Does the fat content really matter all the much? A ton of research is stating that fat content doesn’t actually contribute to getting fat – sugars do.

    If you manage your calories in and calories out, upping fat content in your diet can help you be healthier. It can help joints, skin, brain, etc!

    Just a thought. I lost 35 pounds by getting away from nutrient light foods (like pasta, and bread) and focusing on nutrient rich foods (like spinach, Kale, olives, meat). The things to avoid are trans fat, refined sugars, salt, and high glycemic carbs.

    Reference studies like
    http://www.yalescientific.org/2011/04/research-links-sugar-consumption-fat-production-and-diabetes/
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-mark-hyman/why-eating-a-low-fat-diet_b_634011.html
    http://www.menshealth.com/health/saturated-fat
    http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/index.html

    • You’re correct in stating that the fat content does not have as much effect on weight loss/weight gain as sugar content do. However, the source of the fat certainly affects overall health and the ease of losing/maintaining weight. You mentioned nutrient-rich foods. Well, oil is the LEAST nutrient-rich food you can have. Refined oil, which is what I was commenting on that made the Field Roast sausages so heavy in fat, contains only one item on the nutritional label: Fat. Refined oils are 100% fat. Certain low or no heat processed oils like flax or coconut may still contain beneficial EFA’s and omegas, but processed and refined oils like palm, canola, or even olive oil, lose many of these nutrients in the heating/refining process.

      So in order to get fat and all the good stuff that comes with it, replace these refined oils with WHOLE FOOD sources like nuts, seeds, and avocados (fat from animal products would prove to be more difficult to break down and negate the benefits of the fats contained). The whole food source of healthy fats will result in more energy than the refined oils because your body will expend less energy digesting them. And that to me is the real goal when eating. Food is fuel.

      Spending 120-140 calories on one tablespoon of oil is significantly less satisfying than mowing down on 1/4 cup of cashews or walnuts with 160-180 calories, even though both items are high in fat. The nuts might even contain more fat but its different and more complete. Basically, the end game is to spend every calorie on the most nutrient-dense foods (WHOLE FOOD). So logically, getting your healthy fats from a food that provides other and more efficient nutrition, is the more effective way to health. My bottom line is not just to lose weight but to eat to allow my body to reach its own peak performance, which will be my natural and correct weight. I’m not counting calories, I’m eating to live. Whole foods and nutrient dense for the win! I’ll eat carbs and fats all day long. I have never avoided either. The healthiest I’ve ever felt was when consuming an all-raw diet with some days up to 80% of my calories coming from nuts, seeds, and avocados.

      The best reads on the subject that I’ve come across are “The Thrive Diet” by Brendan Brazier and “Eat to Live” by Dr Joel Fuhrman. The first one is particularly fascinating and easy to understand the stress that refined foods put on our bodies, including to pH levels.

      Thanks for reading and for the comment, really got my brain working and now I’m ready to write all day! 🙂


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